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Enteropathy-associated intestinal T-cell lymphoma (EATL) is a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that affects the small intestine. It is a high-grade, aggressive disease that is often associated with celiac disease. EATL originates from intraepithelial T-lymphocytes, which are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the immune system. The disease is characterized by symptoms such as abdominal pain, weight loss, and diarrhea. 

Types of Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma

There are two types of EATL, Type I and Type II. Type I EATL is the most common type and is strongly associated with celiac disease. It typically occurs in middle-aged adults and is more common in Europe than in North America. Type II EATL is less common and is not associated with celiac disease. It occurs in a younger age group and has a more equal distribution between males and females. Both types are aggressive and have a poor prognosis.

Why Do People Get Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma?

The exact cause of EATL is not known, but it is strongly associated with celiac disease, a condition in which the immune system reacts to gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. It is thought that the chronic inflammation caused by celiac disease may lead to the development of EATL. However, only a small percentage of people with celiac disease develop EATL. Other risk factors may include a family history of lymphoma, a weakened immune system, and certain genetic mutations. Despite these associations, the majority of people with these risk factors do not develop EATL, indicating that other unknown factors are likely involved in its development.

Who Gets Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma?

EATL has an annual incidence rate of 0.5-1 per million, occurring in older adults most often. Those in their 70s are most likely to be diagnosed. People with celiac disease are most likely to get EATL. Even though celiac disease is twice as frequent in females, EATL happens to be more common in males.

Want to Learn More About Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma?

Keep reading HealthTree for Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma's 101 pages!

Enteropathy-associated intestinal T-cell lymphoma (EATL) is a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that affects the small intestine. It is a high-grade, aggressive disease that is often associated with celiac disease. EATL originates from intraepithelial T-lymphocytes, which are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in the immune system. The disease is characterized by symptoms such as abdominal pain, weight loss, and diarrhea. 

Types of Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma

There are two types of EATL, Type I and Type II. Type I EATL is the most common type and is strongly associated with celiac disease. It typically occurs in middle-aged adults and is more common in Europe than in North America. Type II EATL is less common and is not associated with celiac disease. It occurs in a younger age group and has a more equal distribution between males and females. Both types are aggressive and have a poor prognosis.

Why Do People Get Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma?

The exact cause of EATL is not known, but it is strongly associated with celiac disease, a condition in which the immune system reacts to gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. It is thought that the chronic inflammation caused by celiac disease may lead to the development of EATL. However, only a small percentage of people with celiac disease develop EATL. Other risk factors may include a family history of lymphoma, a weakened immune system, and certain genetic mutations. Despite these associations, the majority of people with these risk factors do not develop EATL, indicating that other unknown factors are likely involved in its development.

Who Gets Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma?

EATL has an annual incidence rate of 0.5-1 per million, occurring in older adults most often. Those in their 70s are most likely to be diagnosed. People with celiac disease are most likely to get EATL. Even though celiac disease is twice as frequent in females, EATL happens to be more common in males.

Want to Learn More About Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma?

Keep reading HealthTree for Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma's 101 pages!