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Enteropathy-associated intestinal T-cell lymphoma (EATL) is staged and classified using the Ann Arbor staging system, which is commonly used for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. This system takes into account the number of lymph nodes involved, the location of the lymph nodes, and whether the disease has spread to other organs.

The stages are as follows:

  • Stage I: The lymphoma is in one lymph node region or one organ outside the lymph nodes.
  • Stage II: The lymphoma is in two or more lymph node regions on the same side of the diaphragm or the lymphoma extends from a single lymph node region into a nearby organ.
  • Stage III: The lymphoma is in lymph node regions on both sides of the diaphragm.
  • Stage IV: The lymphoma has spread to several parts of one or more organs other than the lymph nodes.

Classification of Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma

EATL is classified into two types based on what cell features are identified under a microscope:

  • Type I EATL: This is the classic form and is strongly associated with celiac disease. It is more common in Europe and the United States.
  • Type II EATL: This form is not associated with celiac disease and is more common in Asia. It has a worse prognosis compared to Type I.

Phases of Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma

The phases of EATL are not distinctly defined as the disease progression varies from patient to patient. However, the disease generally progresses from an initial phase of inflammation in the small intestine due to gluten sensitivity (in the case of Type I EATL), to the development of abnormal white blood cells called lymphocytes, and finally to the formation of a lymphoma. The speed and severity of this progression can vary widely.

Want to Learn More About Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma?

Keep reading HealthTree for Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma's 101 pages!

Enteropathy-associated intestinal T-cell lymphoma (EATL) is staged and classified using the Ann Arbor staging system, which is commonly used for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. This system takes into account the number of lymph nodes involved, the location of the lymph nodes, and whether the disease has spread to other organs.

The stages are as follows:

  • Stage I: The lymphoma is in one lymph node region or one organ outside the lymph nodes.
  • Stage II: The lymphoma is in two or more lymph node regions on the same side of the diaphragm or the lymphoma extends from a single lymph node region into a nearby organ.
  • Stage III: The lymphoma is in lymph node regions on both sides of the diaphragm.
  • Stage IV: The lymphoma has spread to several parts of one or more organs other than the lymph nodes.

Classification of Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma

EATL is classified into two types based on what cell features are identified under a microscope:

  • Type I EATL: This is the classic form and is strongly associated with celiac disease. It is more common in Europe and the United States.
  • Type II EATL: This form is not associated with celiac disease and is more common in Asia. It has a worse prognosis compared to Type I.

Phases of Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma

The phases of EATL are not distinctly defined as the disease progression varies from patient to patient. However, the disease generally progresses from an initial phase of inflammation in the small intestine due to gluten sensitivity (in the case of Type I EATL), to the development of abnormal white blood cells called lymphocytes, and finally to the formation of a lymphoma. The speed and severity of this progression can vary widely.

Want to Learn More About Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma?

Keep reading HealthTree for Enteropathy-Associated Intestinal T-Cell Lymphoma's 101 pages!

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