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Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is staged and classified based on the extent of skin involvement, the presence of lymph node involvement, the presence of visceral organ involvement, and the presence of circulating cancerous T-cells in the blood. The staging system used is the TNMB system (Tumor, Node, Metastasis, Blood).

Extent of Skin Involvement in CTCL

The 'T' in the TNMB system refers to the extent of skin involvement. This is classified from T1 to T4, with T1 indicating limited skin involvement and T4 indicating tumors or significant skin involvement.

Lymph Node Involvement in CTCL

The 'N' in the TNMB system refers to lymph node involvement. This is classified from N0 to N3, with N0 indicating no lymph node involvement and N3 indicating widespread lymph node involvement.

Visceral Organ Involvement in CTCL

The 'M' in the TNMB system refers to visceral organ involvement. This is classified as M0 or M1, with M0 indicating no visceral organ involvement and M1 indicating the presence of visceral organ involvement.

Presence of Circulating Cancerous T-Cells in CTCL

The 'B' in the TNMB system refers to the presence of circulating malignant T-cells. This is classified as B0 or B1, with B0 indicating no circulating cancerous T-cells and B1 indicating the presence of circulating cancerous T-cells.

Phases of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

CTCL typically progresses through three phases: patch, plaque, and tumor phase. In the patch phase, the skin shows red, scaly patches that may be mistaken for eczema or psoriasis. In the plaque phase, the patches thicken into plaques. In the tumor phase, the plaques develop into tumors. Not all patients progress through all three phases, and the speed of progression can vary widely between individuals.

Want to Learn More About Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma?

Keep reading HealthTree for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma's 101 pages!

Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is staged and classified based on the extent of skin involvement, the presence of lymph node involvement, the presence of visceral organ involvement, and the presence of circulating cancerous T-cells in the blood. The staging system used is the TNMB system (Tumor, Node, Metastasis, Blood).

Extent of Skin Involvement in CTCL

The 'T' in the TNMB system refers to the extent of skin involvement. This is classified from T1 to T4, with T1 indicating limited skin involvement and T4 indicating tumors or significant skin involvement.

Lymph Node Involvement in CTCL

The 'N' in the TNMB system refers to lymph node involvement. This is classified from N0 to N3, with N0 indicating no lymph node involvement and N3 indicating widespread lymph node involvement.

Visceral Organ Involvement in CTCL

The 'M' in the TNMB system refers to visceral organ involvement. This is classified as M0 or M1, with M0 indicating no visceral organ involvement and M1 indicating the presence of visceral organ involvement.

Presence of Circulating Cancerous T-Cells in CTCL

The 'B' in the TNMB system refers to the presence of circulating malignant T-cells. This is classified as B0 or B1, with B0 indicating no circulating cancerous T-cells and B1 indicating the presence of circulating cancerous T-cells.

Phases of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

CTCL typically progresses through three phases: patch, plaque, and tumor phase. In the patch phase, the skin shows red, scaly patches that may be mistaken for eczema or psoriasis. In the plaque phase, the patches thicken into plaques. In the tumor phase, the plaques develop into tumors. Not all patients progress through all three phases, and the speed of progression can vary widely between individuals.

Want to Learn More About Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma?

Keep reading HealthTree for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma's 101 pages!

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