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Staging and Classification of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) is a group of disorders characterized by the inability of the bone marrow to produce enough healthy blood cells. Staging and classification of MDS is crucial in determining the severity of the disease and planning the appropriate treatment strategy.

How is Myelodysplastic Syndrome Staged?

MDS is not typically staged in the same way as other cancers, because it does not usually form solid tumors. Instead, doctors use other systems to classify the disease. The most common system used is the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS). This system takes into account factors such as the number of low blood cell counts (cytopenias), the percentage of immature cells (blasts) in the bone marrow, and any chromosomal abnormalities. The IPSS classifies MDS into four risk groups: low, intermediate-1, intermediate-2, and high.

Classification of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

The World Health Organization (WHO) also classifies MDS based on certain features of the disease. This includes the type and number of blood cells affected, the percentage of blasts in the blood and bone marrow, and any specific genetic changes. The WHO classification divides MDS into several types, including MDS with single lineage dysplasia, MDS with multilineage dysplasia, MDS with ring sideroblasts, MDS with excess blasts, and MDS with isolated del(5q).

Understanding the Phases of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

MDS can be divided into three phases: early, advanced, and final. In the early phase, patients may have few or no symptoms, and the disease may be discovered through routine blood tests. In the advanced phase, symptoms become more noticeable and may include fatigue, shortness of breath, frequent infections, and easy bruising or bleeding. In the final phase, also known as acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the disease becomes a fast-growing cancer of the bone marrow cells. Not all people with MDS will progress to AML, but a significant proportion do, particularly those in the high-risk group according to the IPSS.

Want to Learn More About Myelodysplastic Syndrome?

Keep reading HealthTree for Myelodysplastic Syndrome's 101 pages!

Staging and Classification of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) is a group of disorders characterized by the inability of the bone marrow to produce enough healthy blood cells. Staging and classification of MDS is crucial in determining the severity of the disease and planning the appropriate treatment strategy.

How is Myelodysplastic Syndrome Staged?

MDS is not typically staged in the same way as other cancers, because it does not usually form solid tumors. Instead, doctors use other systems to classify the disease. The most common system used is the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS). This system takes into account factors such as the number of low blood cell counts (cytopenias), the percentage of immature cells (blasts) in the bone marrow, and any chromosomal abnormalities. The IPSS classifies MDS into four risk groups: low, intermediate-1, intermediate-2, and high.

Classification of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

The World Health Organization (WHO) also classifies MDS based on certain features of the disease. This includes the type and number of blood cells affected, the percentage of blasts in the blood and bone marrow, and any specific genetic changes. The WHO classification divides MDS into several types, including MDS with single lineage dysplasia, MDS with multilineage dysplasia, MDS with ring sideroblasts, MDS with excess blasts, and MDS with isolated del(5q).

Understanding the Phases of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

MDS can be divided into three phases: early, advanced, and final. In the early phase, patients may have few or no symptoms, and the disease may be discovered through routine blood tests. In the advanced phase, symptoms become more noticeable and may include fatigue, shortness of breath, frequent infections, and easy bruising or bleeding. In the final phase, also known as acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the disease becomes a fast-growing cancer of the bone marrow cells. Not all people with MDS will progress to AML, but a significant proportion do, particularly those in the high-risk group according to the IPSS.

Want to Learn More About Myelodysplastic Syndrome?

Keep reading HealthTree for Myelodysplastic Syndrome's 101 pages!

Thanks to our HealthTree Community for Myelodysplastic Syndromes Sponsors:

AbbVie
Bristol Myers Squibb

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